CWC Newsletter #47 (December 9, 2020)

By Taylor Ryker, Analyst


Where in the World is Block.one?


Welcome back, Team EOS and EOSIO! With the end of 2020 in several weeks, I would like to take this time to address a burning issue in the community: What has Block.one done for token holders in 2020?


I would like to provide some perspective of the accomplishments of Block.one in 2020 so that we can better see how they are just one part of the EOS community. Block.one's contributions to EOS and EOSIO are not mutually exclusive; rather, what I have observed through their announcements over this past year is that they have:

  1. Updated the EOSIO source code for performance and efficiencies, which the EOS public blockchain has implemented

  2. Highlighted and tracked their investments in the EOS and EOSIO space

  3. Participated in governance on the EOS public blockchain

  4. Outlined their next push into enterprise blockchain software and for eosio developer education

EOSIO Source Code Progress in 2020


Block.one CTO Daniel Larimer and his teams of developers at Block.one have throughout 2020 pumped out several updates to EOSIO 2.0, which was introduced in January 2020.

Did you hear that Block.one released their latest update EOSIO v2.0.8 this past Monday December 7, 2020? Github released notes:

In March 2020, Block.one released notes on their EOSIO software updates.

In June 2020, Block.one released another software update:

These Block.one updates of the EOSIO software have not gone unnoticed:

In addition to the latest update this past Monday, Block.one with the leadership of their Public Blockchain Engagement, a community-arm of the company, has been deeply engaged in upgrading the resource model of the EOS public blockchain to make resource management more efficient for dApp operators and developers. In addition, the new resource model will positively benefit token holders for the model rewards token holders due to the fact that with the increased usage of the EOS public blockchain by dApp operators and users, the demand for EOS tokens will increase.

Block.one will disclose more information regarding the new resource model the week of December 14, 2020.


Block.one's Investments in the EOS and EOSIO blockchain space in 2020


Since late 2019, Block.one has highlighted to the community in a post called "#BuiltOnEOSIO" their investments and other companies that use the EOSIO software. Take a look at all of their spotlight posts on Ultra, Prospectors, Smartpress, TAIKAI, LiquidApps, PUML, AdNode, dfuse, Klevoya, Everipedia, WordProof, LimeChain, Mythical Games, and Spielworks.


In addition, Block.one over the course of 2020 has given out grants, hosted blockchain challenges (Virginia Tech Blockchain Challenge and "Coding for Change" Virtual Hackathon), and awarded an eosio $200,000 bounty (eosio-Ethereum bridge).

But for me, here are the 3 most exciting Block.one's investments that are beginning to bloom: (1) Blankos Block Party, (2) Everipedia, and (3) Voice.


Blankos is an open-world collectibles game on PC.

There current private beta is doing an amazing run:

And how are people receiving the private beta, you may ask?

Another Block.one investment that I am following closely is Everipedia, the blockchain version of Wikipedia. Everipedia's recent partnership with the Associated Press in calling the U.S. Presidential election shows that EOSIO and blockchain overall are becoming more legitimate in the mainstream.

I am also looking forward to the official launch of Voice next Spring 2021. But, in the meantime, the private beta of Voice is progressing nicely with the addition of community curation:

In addition, Voice is recruiting a growing list of influencers to the platform. These influencers will bring their followers onto the Voice platform. It will be interesting to see if and how Voice will sign-up users in tandem with their sponsored influencers.


Steve H. McFly, who has 117 thousand followers on Twitter, is a popular smartphone leaker and is exclusively posting on Voice.

Laurence and Jessica are popular photographer and travel bloggers with a following of 22 thousand on Twitter.

Rachelle Lucas is another influencer on Voice with a Twitter following of 107 thousand.

These are just a few of a larger group of sponsored influencers on Voice. I am delighted to see that Voice is not only geared towards the crypto communities but also non-crypto communities. When mainstream adoption occurs, average users won't even know that Voice is on multiple EOSIO blockchains (including the EOS public blockchain), nor will they even care.


Block.one's Enterprise Blockchain Push and Developer Education


I have previously covered Block.one's participation in governance of the EOS public blockchain through their voting for Block Producers with 100 million votes.


So, I will move on to discuss the final item, Block.one's push into enterprise blockchain consulting and EOSIO developer education. Following the recent announcement of Block.one's partnership with Google Cloud, Block.one provided this press release:


To showcase Block.one's expertise in enterprise blockchain and in larger blockchain issues, representatives from the company are speaking this week at the Singapore Fintech Week at The Working Capitol.

Today's discussion on the Cloud Security Paradox:

And Block.one's support for EOSIO developer growth:

With 1,200 enrollments in mid-November, I can assume that that number is much higher now almost a month later. With the courses free till the end of January 2021, I hope that Block.one extends that date into 2021 to give more developers time to become better dApp creators and architects.


Conclusion: So Where in the World is Block.one?


It confuses me when users on Telegram, Twitter, and Reddit accuse Block.one of abandoning the EOS public blockchain. Their continued updates of the EOSIO software directly and positively impacts the EOS public blockchain.


With the end of 2020 coming to a soon close, I look forward to seeing what Block.one has in store in terms of new developments and releases. With the recent software update in v.2.0.8, I am certain that the developers at Block.one are still hard at work updating the code for better performance and efficiencies.


So, Block.one was never gone, but if you remain adamant that they were gone, at least, I found them for you in this newsletter. I remain confident in Block.one at this time.

See you all next week for another round of the CoolWave Capital Newsletter.


Go EOS!


For More EOS and EOSIO coverage: EOS Nation's Hot Sauce, CryptoWriter's EOSweekly, Crypto Peter's Moran Post, and EOS Go's What Happened This Week on EOSIO.


Disclaimer: Taylor Ryker is not a financial advisor and holds the digital tokens or cryptocurrencies represented in the content above. This content is for informational purposes only, you should not construe any such information or other material as legal, tax, investment, financial, or other advice. Nothing contained in this post constitutes a solicitation, recommendation, endorsement, or offer by myself to buy or sell any securities or other financial instruments in this or in any other jurisdiction in which such solicitation or offer would be unlawful under the securities laws of such jurisdiction. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author. They do not purport to reflect the opinions or views of any of the author’s employers.